Nuytsia
Search

Volumes 1–14 are available for download via the Biodiversity Heritage Library’s (BHL) page for Nuytsia.


Displaying 46 records.

Taxonomic research and the conservation status of flora in the Yilgarn Banded Iron Formation ranges

GIBSON, N., COATES, D.J. AND THIELE, K.R., Nuytsia 17 : 1–12 (2007)

The Banded Iron Formation (BIF) ranges are small, ancient ranges scattered across the Yilgarn Craton in southern Western Australia. Increased exploration and mining of iron ore in Western Australia has resulted in a resurgence of botanical survey on and around the BIF ranges, including the discovery of at least 20 unnamed taxa, nine of which were new to science. Recent taxonomic work, published in this special edition of Nuytsia, has concentrated on naming 17 taxa with distributions centred on these ranges and a further 62 taxa of conservation significance in the southern half of Western Australia. Despite this increase in activity, the conservation status of the flora and vegetation remains poorly documented. Patterns in distribution of threatened, rare and poorly known taxa (Declared Rare Flora and Priority Flora) and patterns in endemism are examined on a subset of the 25 ranges most prospective for mining. Preliminary analysis of endemism supports the hypotheses that these ranges represent both refugial habitats of great antiquity and areas of recent speciation. Across Western Australia there are some 2,240 taxa under consideration for formal listing by the Department of Environment and Conservation as threatened; of these, 475 are yet to be formally named. This situation significantly impedes their conservation assessment.

Two newly described species and a draft key to the species of Sida s.lat. from Western Australia

BARKER, R.M., Nuytsia 17 : 13–30 (2007)

There are a number of new native species of Sida listed in the Western Australian Herbarium’s FloraBase that have not yet been formally described. Of the 56 accepted species names presently listed, nearly half represent undescribed taxa. These are cited as either manuscript or phrase names. Two of the species, Sida ectogama W.R.Barker & R.M.Barker and Sida arsiniata R.M.Barker, previously known by phrase names, are here described and a draft key is provided for the native species of Sida found in Western Australia.

Corymbia cadophora subsp. polychroma (Myrtaceae): a new subspecies from the east Kimberley region of Western Australia

BARRETT, R.L., Nuytsia 17 : 31–36 (2007)

A new subspecies of Corymbia cadophora K.D.Hill & L.A.S.Johnson is described from the east Kimberley region of Western Australia. The new subspecies, Corymbia cadophora subsp. polychroma R.L.Barrett, is only known from a single location where it grows on sandstone adjacent to a banded ironstone deposit on the western side of the Ragged Range. A key is provided to all three subspecies of C. cadophora.

New species of Lepidosperma (Cyperaceae) associated with banded ironstone in southern Western Australia

BARRETT, R.L., Nuytsia 17 : 37–60 (2007)

Eight new species in the Australasian genus Lepidosperma Labill. are described from southern Western Australia. All of the taxa described here have restricted distributions in association with Banded Iron Formation (BIF) ranges and are potentially threatened by present or proposed mining activities. The following new species are described: L. amansiferrum R.L.Barrett, L. bungalbin R.L.Barrett, L. diurnum R.L.Barrett, L. ferricola R.L.Barrett, L. ferriculmen R.L.Barrett, L. gibsonii R.L.Barrett, L. jacksonense R.L.Barrett and L. lyonsii R.L.Barrett.

Lepidosperma gahnioides, a new species of Cyperaceae from the Ravensthorpe region, Western Australia

BARRETT, R.L., Nuytsia 17 : 61–66 (2007)

Lepidosperma gahnioides R.L.Barrett is here described as a new species. This species has a restricted distribution from the Ravensthorpe Range north to Lake Ace, in southern Western Australia, and is potentially threatened by present and proposed mining activities.

Lasiopetalum ferraricollinum (Malvaceae s. lat.: Lasiopetaleae), a new species from the ironstone hills near Forrestania, Western Australia

BENNETT, E.M. AND SHEPHERD, K.A., Nuytsia 17 : 67–72 (2007)

Lasiopetalum ferraricollinum E.M.Benn. & K.A.Sheph. is a new species restricted to a number of ironstone outcrops in the Coolgardie (COO) and Mallee (MAL) IBRA regions. This species, while morphologically allied to L. compactum Paust, is characterised by recurved leaf margins, white to cream flowers and the presence of both scattered stellate hairs and glandular hairs on the outside of the calyx. A description, distribution map, and images of the new species are provided.

Caladenia petrensis and C. saxicola (Orchidaceae), two new ironstone endemics from south-west Western Australia

BROWN, A.P. AND BROCKMAN, G., Nuytsia 17 : 73–80 (2007)

Caladenia petrensis A.P.Br. & G.Brockman and C. saxicola A.P.Br. & G.Brockman are described and illustrated, their relationship with the closely related C. incensa Hopper & A.P.Br. is discussed and a key provided. Both species are placed in Caladenia R.Br. subg. Phlebochilus (Benth.) Hopper & A.P.Br. based on the flowers having long filamentous tepals and the labellum with two rows of broadly anvil-shaped, glossy calli.

Eremophila densifolia subsp. erecta and E. grandiflora (Myoporaceae), two new taxa from south-west Western Australia

BROWN, A.P. AND BUIRCHELL, B., Nuytsia 17 : 81–86 (2007)

Eremophila densifolia F.Muell. subsp. erecta A.P.Br. & B.Buirchell and E. grandiflora A.P.Br. & B.Buirchell are described and illustrated, their relationships with closely related taxa are discussed and a key to the subspecies of E. densifolia provided.

Tetratheca erubescens (Elaeocarpaceae), a new and geographically restricted species from the Coolgardie Biogeographic Region of south-western Australia

BULL, J.P., Nuytsia 17 : 87–96 (2007)

Tetratheca erubescens J.P.Bull, a rare species endemic to the remote and ironstone-rich Koolyanobbing Range, is described and photographically represented. To facilitate recognition, a table comparing relevant characters of morphologically and ecologically similar species of Tetratheca Sm. is provided.

Four new conservation-listed species of Synaphea (Proteaceae: Conospermineae) from the Jarrah Forest region of south-west Western Australia

BUTCHER, R., Nuytsia 17 : 97–116 (2007)

The new species described here are a diverse assemblage of taxa, united in this paper by their geographical occurrence within the Jarrah Forest region of south-west Western Australia and a pressing need to formalise the description of conservation taxa in this State. The taxa have complex taxonomic associations within the groups to which they belong, with intergradation in many characters evident between species. The new species described herein are S. diabolica R.Butcher, S. pandurata R.Butcher, S. polypodioides R.Butcher and S. trinacriformis R.Butcher. A distribution map, image and discussion of affinities are provided for each taxon.

Tetratheca exasperata and T. phoenix (Elaeocarpaceae), two new conservation-listed species allied to T. setigera, from south-west Western Australia

BUTCHER, R., Nuytsia 17 : 117–126 (2007)

The two new species described here are similar to Tetratheca setigera Endl. in having the upper part of the pedicel, the receptacle and the calyx segments densely ornamented with long, red, glandular setae. Tetratheca exasperata R.Butcher differs most readily from T. setigera in its almost glabrous leaves, with strongly revolute margins, and very short, patent stem hairs. This taxon has been infrequently collected from three areas in the Jarrah Forest and Avon Wheatbelt regions and has a Priority Three conservation listing. Tetratheca phoenix R.Butcher differs from T. setigera in its almost glabrous, but prominently tuberculate, stems and densely glandular-hairy ovary. This taxon is restricted to Mt Cooke, c. 70 km south-east of Perth and has a Priority Two conservation listing. These two new species are described and illustrated here, and their distributions are mapped.

Tetratheca pilata (Elaeocarpaceae), a new and apparently rare species from the Ongerup area of south-west Western Australia

BUTCHER, R., Nuytsia 17 : 127–134 (2007)

Tetratheca pilata R.Butcher is described here as a new species and differentiated from similar taxa based on the prominent apical seta on its linear leaves and its more or less opposite-decussate phyllotaxis. Tetratheca pilata is an apparently rare, granite endemic from the Ongerup area and is listed as Priority One under the Department of Environment and Conservation’s Conservation Codes for Western Australian Flora. Images of this taxon and a distribution map are provided.

Persoonia manotricha (Proteaceae: Persoonioideae), a new species associated with Banded Iron Formation ranges in the Midwest region, Western Australia

BUTCHER, R. AND MARKEY, A.S., Nuytsia 17 : 135–146 (2007)

The new species, Persoonia manotricha A.S.Markey & R.Butcher, is morphologically similar to P. bowgada P.H.Weston and P. hexagona P.H.Weston in its habit, in having six alternating grooves and ridges on its subterete, pungent leaves and in its floral structure. While its leaf morphology and anatomy closely ally P. manotricha with P. bowgada, the new species can be distinguished by its longer pedicels and by its flowers being less pubescent with a glabrous to sparsely pubescent ovary, similar to those of P. hexagona. Comparative leaf anatomy confirms that P. hexagona is distinctly different in having relatively broad longitudinal grooves in its leaves. The characteristic darkness of these broad grooves, in dried specimens, is not exclusively the result of the stomatal guard cells blackening, as previously thought, but also results from the greater visibility of the underlying mesophyll. Persoonia manotricha is commonly found on the lower, rocky slopes of Banded Iron Formation (BIF) ranges in tall Acacia dominated shrubland. A taxonomic description of the new species, including images and a distribution map, is provided. The new species is integrated into the most recently published key to Persoonia species.

Prostanthera ferricola (Lamiaceae), a new species from Western Australia

CONN, B.J. AND SHEPHERD, K.A., Nuytsia 17 : 147–152 (2007)

Prostanthera ferricola B.J.Conn & K.A.Sheph., a distinctive new species endemic to ironstone and quartzite hills in the northern Yilgarn region of Western Australia, is described. This species is readily distinguished from P. centralis B.J.Conn and P. magnifica C.A.Gardner by its smaller leaves (5.5–10 mm long), purple-mauve adaxial surface of the calyx, a larger corolla (18–20 mm long) with hairs and glands on the outer surface, an absence of trichomes on the dorsal surface of the connective of the anthers and a longer pistil (20–21 mm long). Images of the holotype and field photographs of the habit and inflorescence are included along with a distribution map.

A new species of Petrophile (Proteaceae) from south-western Australia

CRANFIELD, R.J. AND MACFARLANE, T.D., Nuytsia 17 : 153–158 (2007)

A new species, Petrophile vana Cranfield & T.Macfarlane, is described from the Murchison and Yalgoo Bioregions of Western Australia. The new species is known from only three localities where it grows on laterite breakaway ridges. It is illustrated and mapped, and comparisons are made with P. pauciflora Foreman from the same region.

Hakea chromatropa (Proteaceae: Grevilleoideae), an apparently rare new species from Western Australia

GEORGE, A.S. AND BARKER, R.M., Nuytsia 17 : 159–164 (2007)

A new species from the agricultural region of Western Australia, Hakea chromatropa A.S.George & R.M.Barker, is described. It is closely related to H. ilicifolia R.Br.

Three new and geographically restricted species of Leucopogon (Ericaceae: Styphelioideae: Styphelieae) from south-west Western Australia

HISLOP, M. AND CHAPMAN, A.R., Nuytsia 17 : 165–184 (2007)

Leucopogon borealis Hislop & A.R.Chapm., L. spectabilis Hislop & A.R.Chapm. and L. validus Hislop & A.R.Chapm. are described, illustrated and their distributions mapped. All have conservation coding. Five informal, subgeneric groups for Leucopogon R.Br. s. str. in Western Australia are delineated. A lectotype is also selected for Leucopogon apiculatus R.Br.

Diamond gum (Eucalyptus rhomboidea: Myrtaceae), a new threatened species endemic to the Bremer Range of the Southwest Australian Floristic Region

HOPPER, S.D. AND NICOLLE, D., Nuytsia 17 : 185–194 (2007)

Eucalyptus rhomboidea Hopper & D.Nicolle, first collected by the late Ken Newbey in 1979, is described as new. The species is a member of Eucalyptus ser. Subulatae Blakely allied to E. transcontinentalis Maiden. It is confined to the Bremer Range, and it is at risk from present and proposed mining activities.

New species of Andersonia (Ericaceae) of conservation concern

LEMSON, K.L., Nuytsia 17 : 195–214 (2007)

Six new species of Andersonia R.Br. – A. annelsii Lemson, A. ferricola Lemson, A. geniculata Lemson, A. redolens Lemson, A. hammersleyana Lemson and A. pinaster Lemson – are described, mapped and illustrated.

A new species of Neurachne (Poaceae) from Western Australia

MACFARLANE, T.D., Nuytsia 17 : 215–222 (2007)

Neurachne annularis T.Macfarlane is described and illustrated with photographs and a distribution map. The new species forms Triodia-like hummocks and grows on and around banded ironstone ranges in the Yilgarn region of Western Australia where it is often dominant in the understorey. The species has the C3 photosynthetic pathway and is diploid with n = 9, one of three species with that combination in a genus now of seven species. It is morphologically closest to N. tenuifolia S.T.Blake, from ranges in Central Australia.

Wurmbea inflata (Colchicaceae), a new species from the Gascoyne region of Western Australia

MACFARLANE, T.D. AND CASE, A.L., Nuytsia 17 : 223–228 (2007)

A new species of Wurmbea, W. inflata T.Macfarlane & A.Case, is described and illustrated with photographs and a distribution map. The new species is known from a number of populations from the Kennedy Range to east of Mt Augustus, where it grows on rocky hillsides. It is notable for the enlarged fruits composed of four carpels.

Three new wattles (Acacia: Mimosoideae) from the Kalannie region, Western Australia

MASLIN, B.R., Nuytsia 17 : 229–240 (2007)

The following new taxa are described: Acacia inceana Domin. subsp. latifolia Maslin, A. stanleyi Maslin and A. synoria Maslin. The first two taxa are listed as Priority One and the last as Priority Two according to the Department of Environment and Conservation’s Conservation Codes for the Western Australian Flora.

Acacia burrowsiana (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae), a new arid zone species from near Mt Magnet, Western Australia

MASLIN, B.R., Nuytsia 17 : 241–246 (2007)

Acacia burrowsiana Maslin, a new species of Acacia Mill. referable to sect. Juliflorae (Benth.) Maiden & Betche is described. It occurs in the south-west arid zone of Western Australia where it is known from only near Mt Magnet and Sandstone. Acacia burrowsiana was listed under its phrase name, Acacia sp. Mt Magnet (T. McKenzie 5), as a Priority One species under the Department of Environment and Conservation’s Conservation Codes for Western Australian Flora.

Acacia cockertoniana (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae), a new species from banded ironstone ranges of the south-west arid zone, Western Australia

MASLIN, B.R., Nuytsia 17 : 247–252 (2007)

Acacia cockertoniana Maslin, a new species with a restricted distribution in the south-west arid zone of Western Australia is described. The species is restricted to banded ironstone ranges which accounts for its discontinuous distribution between Mt Jackson (130 km north of Southern Cross) and near Mt Magnet (c. 270 km north-west of Mt Jackson). Sterile specimens from north of Mt Magnet require confirmation as being this species. Acacia cockertoniana is often abundant in the places where it occurs and current evidence suggests that it is most common in the vicinity of the Windarling Range. Acacia cockertoniana appears to be most closely related to A. balsamea Cowan & Maslin.

Two new species of Acacia (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae) from the Koolanooka Hills in the northern wheatbelt region of south-west Western Australia

MASLIN, B.R. AND BUSCUMB, C., Nuytsia 17 : 253–262 (2007)

The following two new species of Acacia from the Koolanooka Hills, a low banded ironstone range in the northern wheatbelt region of south-west Western Australia (east of Morawa), are described: Acacia graciliformis Maslin & Buscumb and Acacia muriculata Maslin & Buscumb. Both are listed as Priority One species according to the Department of Environment and Conservation’s Conservation Codes for Western Australia Flora.

Two new Acacia species (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae) from banded ironstone ranges in the Midwest region of south-west Western Australia

MASLIN, B.R. AND BUSCUMB, C., Nuytsia 17 : 263–272 (2007)

The following two new species of Acacia Mill. from an area of banded ironstone in the Midwest region of south-west Western Australia (between Morawa and Paynes Find) area are described: Acacia karina Maslin & Buscumb and A. woodmaniorum Maslin & Buscumb. Both species are listed as a Priority Two species according to the Department of Environment and Conservation’s Conservation Codes for Western Australian Flora.

Two new Western Australian species of Drummondita (Rutaceae: Boronieae) from banded ironstone ranges of the Yilgarn Craton

MEISSNER, R.A. AND MARKEY, A.S., Nuytsia 17 : 273–280 (2007)

Two new species of Drummondita Harv. are described, both of which occur on rocky hillsides on the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia. One of these, D. fulva A.S.Markey & R.A.Meissn., has close affinities to D. microphylla Paul G.Wilson but differs in having a reddish apiculus on the leaf apex, tawny new growth, and sub-orbicular, flattened sepals. The other, D. rubroviridis R.A.Meissn, is closely allied to D. wilsonii F.H.Mollemans, from which it is distinguished by a combination of spreading leaves, solitary, larger red flowers with green petal lobes, and a pointed apical leaf gland. Drummondita fulva is relatively widespread, occurring on both Banded Iron Formation and associated metasedimentary rocks in the Yalgoo region, while D. rubroviridis has a restricted distribution and appears to be endemic to a single banded ironstone range in the Koolanooka Hills. A taxonomic description of these two new species, images and maps of their respective distributions are provided.

A new geographically disjunct and apparently rare subspecies of Eucalyptus jutsonii (Myrtaceae) from Western Australia

NICOLLE, D. AND FRENCH, M.E., Nuytsia 17 : 281–288 (2007)

The newly discovered subspecies E. jutsonii Maiden subsp. kobela D.Nicolle & M.E.French is described, differing from the typical subspecies in the narrower adult leaves, the generally more slender flower buds with a more pointed operculum and the slightly smaller fruits. The new subspecies is disjunct from the typical subspecies by over 400 kilometres and is known from a single site spanning approximately five kilometres. Eucalyptus jutsonii subsp. kobela may be under threat from mining-related activity and the subspecies meets the criteria for listing as Priority One under the Conservation Codes for Western Australian Flora. A key to E. ser. Micrantherae is included.

A review of the sectional classification of Dicrastylis (Lamiaceae: Chloantheae) and four new arid-zone species from Western Australia

RYE, B.L., Nuytsia 17 : 289–324 (2007)

A new delimitation is proposed for three of the sections (Pyramidatae Munir, Spicatae Munir and Verticillatae Munir) of the genus Dicrastylis Drumm. ex Harv. Keys are given to the five sections of the genus and to the 15 Western Australian species of sections Pyramidatae and Spicatae. Four new species from the arid and semi-arid zones of Western Australia are described as Dicrastylis cundeeleensis Rye, D. kumarinensis Rye, D. mitchellii Rye and D. subterminalis Rye. Dicrastylis petermannensis Munir is reduced to a synonym of D. gilesii F.Muell., D. microphyllum Munir to a synonym of D. flexuosa (W.R.Price) C.A.Gardner, and D. georgei Munir is tentatively treated as a synonym of D. cordifolia Munir. None of the previously published subspecies, varieties and forms for any members of the genus is recognised formally here. However, further study of several species complexes occurring in the arid zone is needed as they are extremely variable and taxonomically difficult.

Micromyrtus trudgenii (Myrtaceae: Chamelaucieae), a new species from the Blue Hill Range area of south-western Australia

RYE, B.L., Nuytsia 17 : 325–330 (2007)

The new species Micromyrtus trudgenii Rye has conservation priority, being restricted to banded ironstone or dolerite hills in a small area south-east of Yalgoo in Western Australia. It is closely related to M. racemosa Benth., differing in its more elongate leaves with a distinct mucro, its yellow flowers and the almost parallel longitudinal slits on its anthers.

Five new conservation-listed species of Goodenia (Goodeniaceae) from southern Western Australia

SAGE, L.W. AND SHEPHERD, K.A., Nuytsia 17 : 331–346 (2007)

The following new species of Goodenia are described: G. corralina L.W.Sage & K.A.Sheph, G. granitica L.W.Sage & K.A.Sheph., G. jaurdiensis L.W.Sage & K.A.Sheph., G. salina L.W.Sage & K.A.Sheph. and G. turleyae L.W.Sage & K.A.Sheph. All of these species are apparently geographically restricted and have conservation priority. Distribution maps and images of the holotypes are included and amendments to the “Flora of Australia” Goodenia key are given to accommodate these new species.

Pityrodia iphthima (Lamiaceae), a new species endemic to banded ironstone in Western Australia, with notes on two informally recognised Pityrodia

SHEPHERD, K.A., Nuytsia 17 : 347–352 (2007)

Pityrodia iphthima K.A.Sheph. is a new species recently discovered on a single banded ironstone outcrop north of Meekatharra. This species is allied to the declared rare P. augustensis Munir, but is morphologically distinct in having discolorous leaves, larger, ovate bracts, longer calyx tube, shorter branched hairs on the outer surface of the calyx and shorter filaments. Distribution and habit images of P. iphthima are provided. In addition, the informal taxon Pityrodia sp. Dalwallinu (M. Hislop 1860) is synonymised with P. bartlingii (Lehm.) Benth.

Three new species of Tecticornia (formerly Halosarcia) (Chenopodiaceae: Salicornioideae) from the Eremaean Botanical Province, Western Australia

SHEPHERD, K.A., Nuytsia 17 : 353–366 (2007)

Three new samphires that occur on saline floodways and around salt lakes in the semi-arid and arid zones of the Eremaean Botanical Province are described. Tecticornia cymbiformis K.A.Sheph. & Paul G.Wilson, a conservation Priority listed species currently known from three disjunct populations, has been recognised as distinct for a number of years but has never been formally described. A second Priority species, T. mellaria K.A.Sheph., is only found on gypseous dunes in the vicinity of a large gold mine in the eastern Goldfields. Tecticornia laevigata K.A.Sheph., is closely allied to T. mellaria but has a widespread distribution and is not considered to be under threat. Images are included along with distribution maps and an amended “Flora of Australia” key to the former genus Halosarcia Paul G.Wilson.

Tecticornia indefessa (Chenopodiaceae: Salicornioideae), a new mat samphire (formerly Tegicornia) from north of Esperance, Western Australia

SHEPHERD, K.A., Nuytsia 17 : 367–374 (2007)

A taxon previously thought to be an intergeneric hybrid between an unknown species of the former genus Halosarcia Paul G.Wilson (now Tecticornia Hook.f.) and Tegicornia uniflora Paul G.Wilson (now Tecticornia uniflora (Paul G.Wilson) K.A.Sheph. & Paul G.Wilson) is recognised as a distinct species: Tecticornia indefessa K.A.Sheph. While sharing a similar mat-like habit and perianth structure to the dioecious T. uniflora, this taxon has bisexual or female flowers with distinctive seeds. Previous analysis of nuclear DNA sequences supports this taxon as distinct. Illustrations and maps and a revised description of T. uniflora are included.

Two new Western Australian species of Dodonaea (Sapindaceae) from northern Yilgarn ironstones

SHEPHERD, K.A., RYE, B.L., MEISSNER, R.A. AND WEST, J.G., Nuytsia 17 : 375–384 (2007)

Dodonaea amplisemina K.A.Sheph. & Rye and D. scurra K.A.Sheph. & R.A.Meissn. are two new species that occur on banded ironstone, greenstone or basalt hills in the Yilgarn region of Western Australia and are here described. Both species have conservation priority. A distribution map and photographs of the new species are presented along with amendments to the relevant part of the “Flora of Australia” key to species of Dodonaea.

Kunzea acicularis, K. strigosa and K. similis subsp. mediterranea (Myrtaceae) - new taxa from near Ravensthorpe, Western Australia

TOELKEN, H.R. AND CRAIG, G.F., Nuytsia 17 : 385–396 (2007)

A re-assessment of additional material in the Kunzea preissiana Schauer and K. similis Toelken complexes resulted in two new species and a subspecies being described: K. acicularis Toelken & G.F.Craig, K. strigosa Toelken & G.F.Craig and K. similis subsp. mediterranea Toelken & G.F.Craig. A revised key to Kunzea Rchb. subsect. Floridae Toelken, a table of characters for critical species in the K. preissiana complex, and detailed discussions are provided.

Lobelia cleistogamoides (Campanulaceae, subfamily Lobelioideae, Lobelia sect. Holopogon), a new species related to L. heterophylla from Western Australia and South Australia

WALSH, N.G. AND ALBRECHT, D.E., Nuytsia 17 : 397–402 (2007)

Lobelia cleistogamoides N.G.Walsh & Albr., a member of the L. heterophylla Labill. complex, is described. The new species is known to occur from near Mullewa to just east of Esperance in Western Australia, with a disjunct occurrence on the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia. It differs from L. heterophylla s. str. principally in its much smaller flowers and has been known previously as Lobelia sp. small flowers (K.F. Kenneally 7705). Current collection information precludes an accurate assessment of its conservation status.

Allocasuarina hystricosa (Casuarinaceae): a new species from south-west Western Australia, with notes on related species

WEGE, J.A., Nuytsia 17 : 403–414 (2007)

Allocasuarina hystricosa Wege is described as new. Known largely from the Ravensthorpe region, this dioecious species is characterised by erect branchlets with 10–12 leaf teeth per whorl, long articles (mostly 15–35 mm long), and three (more rarely two or up to five) spines per cone bracteole protuberance. Revised descriptions are provided for the phylogenetically related species A. scleroclada (L.A.S.Johnson) L.A.S.Johnson, A. corniculata (F.Muell.) L.A.S.Johnson, A. spinosissima (C.A.Gardner) L.A.S.Johnson, A. globosa L.A.S.Johnson and A. tortiramula E.M.Benn., and a lectotype chosen for A. tortiramula. A putative new taxon, A. spinosissima subsp. short spine (D.L. Serventy & A.R. Main s.n. 25/8/1960), is highlighted for further research. The recent acquisition by the Western Australian Herbarium of a significant number of Allocasuarina specimens of Western Australian origin is noted.

New species and new circumscriptions in Stylidium (Stylidiaceae)

WEGE, J.A., Nuytsia 17 : 415–432 (2007)

The following four triggerplants from south-west Western Australia are newly described: Stylidium applanatum Wege, S. bellum Wege, S. diademum Wege and S. rosulatum Wege. Stylidium luteum R.Br. subsp. clavatum Carlquist is raised to species level, S. squamellosum DC. and S. striatum Lindl. are redefined, S. rigidifolium Mildbr. is placed into synonymy under S. striatum, and S. zeicolor F.L.Erickson & J.H.Willis is reinstated. With the exception of S. zeicolor and S. diademum, all of these species have a conservation listing.

Observations on the rare triggerplant Stylidium coroniforme (Stylidiaceae) and the description of two allied taxa of conservation concern

WEGE, J.A. AND COATES, D.J., Nuytsia 17 : 433–444 (2007)

Stylidium amabile Wege & Coates, a new, rare triggerplant from near Maya in south-west Western Australia, is described and illustrated. This new species has morphological affinity to the rare Wongan Hills triggerplant S. coroniforme F.L.Erickson & J.H.Willis, but has a distinct stigma, a different pattern of corolla markings and is genetically distinct. A revised description of S. coroniforme is provided and S. coroniforme subsp. amblyphyllum Wege, a new infraspecific taxon with distinctive leaves and a distribution near Quairading, is recognised. These three taxa are among the most geographically restricted within the triggerplant genus and all are vulnerable to local extinction.

Two new triggerplants (Stylidium; Stylidiaceae) from the eastern margin of the Swan Coastal Plain, Western Australia

WEGE, J.A., KEIGHERY, G.J. AND KEIGHERY, B.J., Nuytsia 17 : 445–452 (2007)

Stylidium ferricola Wege & Keighery and S. korijekup Wege, B.J.Keighery & Keighery are newly described. Stylidium ferricola is endemic to the southern ironstones near Busselton and is distinctive in the genus on account of its compact, rosetted habit, narrowly-oblanceolate leaves with entire margins and a hair-like mucro, paniculate inflorescences, oblong to cylindrical hypanthia bearing glandular trichomes, and vertically-paired corolla lobes. Stylidium korijekup is known from a single population occurring on laterite soils near Harvey and is characterised by a cormaceous habit, petiolate leaves, glabrous scapes bearing scattered sterile bracts, paniculate inflorescences, glabrous hypanthia and calyces, creamy-yellow and laterally-paired corolla lobes, and six, oblong, red-tipped throat appendages. Both species are flagged as being of conservation concern.

A new species of Arabidella (Brassicaceae) from Western Australia

WEGE, J.A. AND LEPSCHI, B.J., Nuytsia 17 : 453–458 (2007)

Arabidella chrysodema Lepschi & Wege is described as new. Named for its widespread distribution in the Goldfields region of southern Western Australia, this species differs from others in the genus in being an herbaceous annual with pinnatifid leaves and a narrowly elliptic to narrowly oblong siliqua. Photographs and a distribution map are provided along with a key to the species of Arabidella.

Three new species of Aotus (Leguminosae: Mirbelieae) from south-western Australia

WILKINS, C.F. AND CHAPPILL, J.A., Nuytsia 17 : 459–468 (2007)

The following three species of Aotus Sm. of the legume tribe Mirbelieae are here described as new: A. franklandii Chappill & C.F.Wilkins, A. lanea Chappill & C.F.Wilkins and A. prosacris Chappill & C.F.Wilkins. They are found in the south-west of Western Australia and are listed as Priority species for conservation by the Western Australian Department of Environment and Conservation. They are described prior to generic revision, to provide characters for species identification to facilitate their conservation.

Five new species of Eutaxia (Leguminosae: Mirbelieae) from south-western Australia

WILKINS, C.F. AND CHAPPILL, J.A., Nuytsia 17 : 469–482 (2007)

Five species of Eutaxia R.Br. of the legume tribe Mirbelieae are here described as new: Eutaxia actinophylla Chappill & C.F.Wilkins, E. andocada Chappill & C.F.Wilkins, E.lasiocalyx Chappill & C.F.Wilkins, E.nanophylla Chappill & C.F.Wilkinsand E. rubricarina Chappill & C.F.Wilkins. They occur in the south-west of Western Australia and are here described prior to completion of the generic revision since all species, except for E. rubricarina, are listed as Priority Flora by the Western Australian Department of Environment and Conservation.

Three new species of Latrobea (Leguminosae: Mirbelieae) from south-western Australia

WILKINS, C.F. AND CHAPPILL, J.A., Nuytsia 17 : 483–492 (2007)

Three species of Latrobea Meisn. from south-western Australia which are part of the Mirbelieae tribe are here described as new, L. colophona Chappill & C.F.Wilkins, L. pinnacula Chappill & C.F.Wilkins, and L. recurva Chappill & C.F.Wilkins. They are described prior to generic revision, as they are either declared as rare or are listed as priority species under the Western Australian Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) Conservation Codes for Western Australian Flora.

Preface

WEGE, J.A., SHEPHERD, K.A. AND BUTCHER, R., Nuytsia 17 : (2007)