Plant of the Month — April 2019

Licea xanthospora E.M.Davison, P.J.N.Davison, M.D.Barrett & R.L.Barrett

Find out more about Licea xanthospora E.M.Davison, P.J.N.Davison, M.D.Barrett & R.L.Barrett

Licea xanthospora is a slime mould (Myxomycete) that occurs in the Charnley River and Bachsten areas in the Kimberley region. It’s most certainly more widespread, but being small it is easily overlooked, and the fruiting bodies occur during the relatively inaccessible wet season. This species is variable in form, from small sporangia to reticulate plasmodiocarps up to 2 mm long. The surface is a dark brick or rusty tawny colour and at maturity the surface dehisces into large plates exposing a hyaline covering over the sienna coloured spore mass.

Licea xanthospora is found in Eucalyptus miniata woodland over sand flats and Melaleuca/Antidesma thickets over swampy alluvial soil.

Licea is a genus of small, usually inconspicuous myxomycetes. They are most frequently observed on bark that has been incubated for several weeks in moist chamber. Licea xanthospora is unusual for the genus in its large size and yellow spores with verruculose – capitate warts.

Licea xanthospora was first described in 2013 by the Herbarium’s Research Associates Dr Elaine Davison, Dr Russell Barrett and Dr Matthew Barrett, from which most of this text was transcribed.

Photo: P. Davison

Find out more about Licea xanthospora E.M.Davison, P.J.N.Davison, M.D.Barrett & R.L.Barrett

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